Henna Tattoo: Beware, Dark or Black ones contain allergies or allergenic additives!

Aesthetic and ephemeral henna tattoos bloom in summer on the ankles and shoulders; particularly among the young. Prudence, however, they are dark or black: they contain allergenic additives.

From a small thorny tree, henna has been used for millennia for cosmetic purposes. Henna tattoos allow every whim, without pain, and last only a few weeks (usually three).

BANISH THE BLACK HENNA

In normal conditions of use, the henna plant is no problem. The catch? For a longer lasting color and enhance the color, tattooists often add an allergen compound, para-phenylenediamine (PPD).

“This additive is present in many aspects of everyday life, such as hair dyes and jeans, says dermatologist Nina Roos. But its use in henna tattoos makes it dangerous, because of its high concentration and a use in direct contact with the skin. ”

The National Security Agency of the drug (MSNA) has renewed its warning and strongly discourages the creation of a black henna temporary tattoo.

More color of henna is dark; it contains the most offending additive, PPD. This is called black henna. The only precaution that is worth: ensure, before getting a tattoo that the product used is brown or orange, indicating that it is natural henna without additives.

RECOGNIZE AN ALLERGY AFTER A HENNA TATTOO

The addition of a black henna dye, para-phenylenediamine (PPD), can cause allergic reactions, some serious. It is difficult to estimate the affected population, probably because all cases are not reported. However, despite warnings from health authorities for several years, there has been a progression of these allergies: dozens of cases are reported each year in MSNA. This is mostly girls.

Allergies result in contact dermatitis, occurring a few days to a few weeks after the completion of the tattoo. “Itching, rash vesicular, oozing or crusting, pain … local reactions may be limited to the tattooed part and follow the lines of pattern, but also extend to the surrounding area or to the whole body, ” says Nina Roos.

SOMETIMES SEVERE REACTIONS LEADING TO HOSPITALIZATION

“Even if moderate symptoms, it is better consult the dermatologist continues. Doctors are effectively required to report all cases to ANSM, which allows strengthen the health surveillance. ”

The allergic reaction is treated with corticosteroids light, possibly a healing cream. Healing can take three to four weeks, and the rash sometimes leaves the skin a brown coloration may persist for some time.

Some severe reactions may require “taking urgent medical attention or hospitalization”, warning ANSM.

ALLERGIC TO LIFE THE BLACK DYE PPD

After a reaction to para-phenylenediamine (PPD), one is allergic to life in this compound. And awareness is irreversible.

Or the PPD is a widely used product in industry. It may be present in the rubber (bike handles, boots), fur, textiles (jeans), hair dyes, shoe polish, plastics…

Contracting an allergy to PPD, in addition to the immediate discomfort, can cause daily discomfort; even prevent the exercise of certain professions, the barber, for example.

The Medicines Agency said that the para is a “permitted in cosmetics, only in hair dyes at a concentration not exceeding 6% substance”.

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